Tag Archives: england

Libraries as repositories for the digital universe

From this point forward, the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the National Library of Wales, the Bodleian Libraries, Cambridge University Library and Trinity College Library Dublin will have the right to receive a copy of every UK electronic publication, on the same basis as they have received print publications such as books, magazines and newspapers for several centuries. (…)
The regulations, known as legal deposit, will ensure that ephemeral materials like websites can be collected, preserved forever and made available to future generations of researchers, providing the fullest possible record of life and society in the UK in the 21st century for people 50, 100, even 200 or more years in the future.

See also: British Library: The Curators’ 100

Wie der Teppich von Bayeux auch heute noch die Geschichte von Wilhelm dem Eroberer erzählt

The Animated Bayeux Tapestry

The Animated Bayeux Tapestry was created as a student project while at Goldsmiths College. Just as the historic original embroidary does, the animation depicts the lead up to to the Norman Invasion of Britain in 1066. Starts about halfway through the original work at the appearence of Halley’s Comet and concludes at the Battle of Hastings. Marc Sylvan redid the soundtrack to include orignal music and sound effects (2009-09-21).

Animation by David Newton; Music and sound design by Marc Sylvan; http://potionpictures.co.uk/ (2013-02-09).

BBC News: Bayeux tapestry panel nears completion. Members of a small community in Alderney are completing the final panels of the Bayeux Tapestry  (2013-02-09).

Leseverführer

Perhaps the most famous literary drowning of them all, immortalised in Millais’ painting, though the effect is somewhat dampened – if you’ll forgive the pun – when you realise poor Lizzie Siddal modelled for it in a cold bath. But the pity and beauty of Shakespeare’s poetry can withstand even that Pre-Raphaelite passing-off: “Her clothes spread wide; And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up … but long it could not be Till that her garments, heavy with their drink, Pull’d the poor wretch … To muddy death.”

Lynn Shepherd: Lynn Shepherd’s 10 fictional drownings, in: guardian.co.uk, 2013-03-06.
Bild: John Everett Millais (1829-1896): Ophelia. Ca. 1851. Tate Britain (Google Art Project).

Versteckt in Sondersammlungen und Archiven: Monster des 10. Jahrhunderts

Belief in the existence of monstrous races of human beings was central to medieval thinking, although almost everything about them was open to debate and discussion.  The only characteristic universally agreed upon was that they were always to be found far away, beyond the borders of the world as it was then known.  Almost as common were references to the physical deformities of the monstrous races: there were gigantic races and tiny races, those with extremities misshapen, missing, enlarged, or multiplied, and every variety of human/animal hybrid.

Sarah J. Biggs: Monsters and Marvels in the Beowulf Manuscript, in: Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts Blog, 2013-03-06.

Image

Miniatur eines Vertreters der langohrigen Panotii, aus den Marvels of the East, England, Ende 10. Jh., British Library, Cotton MS Vitellius A XV, f. 104r.

The panotii were so timid that they would flee immediately upon seeing a stranger, ‘so swiftly one might think that they flew.’

Tudor Banquet: Belebte Ausstattung von Wohnräumen im Museum

Mr. Day emphasized that he has more in mind than presenting an exquisite table. “The thing that has been ignored by the art-history world is what these objects were used for, their function,” he said in a telephone interview. “My whole career within the museum sector has been based on trying to get precious objects out of the display cases and onto the table to show how they were used.”

Ted Loos: Setting a Place for History, in: nytimes.com, 2013-02-21.